How To Put On Compression Stockings

To put on a regular pair of socks, most people scrunch them up, stick their foot in, and pull. Try this with a compression stocking and you’ll get nowhere fast! Here's the correct way to put on your compression stockings.
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For Lymphedema Professionals

BrightLife Direct has responded to the many Professional Therapists and Nurses who have been requesting wrapping devices for their patients in the early bandaging phase of treatment.
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How To Use A Stocking Donner

If you have trouble bending at the waist, crossing your legs, or have decreased hand strength, putting on compression stockings can be very difficult, if not impossible.  BrightLife Direct carries various types of devices to assist you.
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Does Medicare cover compression garments?

This is a question that we are frequently asked. The short answer is “No”. However, there is legislation currently before congress that would direct Medicare to cover compression garments for the treatment of lymphedema.
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Relief From Aching Legs

People who suffer from aching legs will tell you that it is no small thing to suffer from. Here are some products that can help fight tired, achy legs at the end of the day.
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Blood Clots and Thrombosis

The National Alliance for Thrombosis and Thrombophilia is a patient-led advocacy organization that includes many of the nation’s foremost experts on blood clots and blood clotting disorders.
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What is compression hosiery?

Is the correct name support stocking, compression hosiery, or compression sock?  The terms are interchangeably, and mean the same thing. Here's what you need to know about compression garments.
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Which donning glove is right for you?

Donning gloves are the easiest, cheapest and most effective tool available to help you put on your stockings. Donning gloves allow you to grip and pull on the sheerest of compression hosiery while helping to prevent snags, runs or poke holes.
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Compression and Fabrics

You may have seen the characters “mmHg” next to the compression level of a stocking, such as 20-30mmHg. This stands for “millimeters of mercury.”
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